Application Topic
   >  Screen Capture using KDEnlive
   >  Using RecordMyDesktop
   >  Using Istanbul
   >  Using FFMPEG

 

Using RecordMyDesktop to Capture your Screen

Introduction to RecordMyDesktop

RecordMyDesktop is a standalone utility which allows you to record what is displayed on your screen in real-time (-or near real-time). This is useful for producing online training packages and tutorials (-such as our own video tutorials). This provides a much better quality output (-i.e. free from shadows and lighting / positioning problems) than filming your screen with a video camera (-again, see our early tutorials, which were shot using a digital camera for the contrast in quality).

When you run RecordMyDesktop is a utility which allows you to record what is displayed on your screen in real-time (-or near real-time). This is useful for producing online training packages and tutorials (-such as our own video tutorials). This provides a much better quality output (-i.e. free from shadows and lighting / positioning problems) than filming your screen with a video camera (-again, see our early tutorials, which were shot using a digital camera for the contrast in quality).


Installing RecordMyDesktop

If you are running a Debian based distro, such as Ubuntu, then RecordMyDesktop can be installed from the command line by typing:

sudo apt-get install recordmydesktop gtk-recordmydesktop

For Fedora, then RecordMyDesktop can be installed using the command:

sudo yum install gtk-recordmydesktop

You can also search your Software Centre for it and install it from there!


Running RecordMyDesktop from the Command Line

RecordMyDesktop can be run from the command line using the command:

recordmydesktop [<Output Filename>]

Note: the <Output Filename> is optional: if not specified, the output will be written to a file called out.ogv in your /home/<user> directory

For example:

$ recordmydesktop
[1] 2964
$ Initial recording window is set to:
X:0   Y:0    Width:1440    Height:900
Adjusted recording window is set to:
X:0   Y:2    Width:1440    Height:896
Your window manager appears to be Mutter


Detected compositing window manager.
Reverting to full screen capture at every frame.
To disable this check run with --no-wm-check
(though that is not advised, since it will probably produce faulty results).

Initializing...
Buffer size adjusted to 4096 from 4096 frames.
Opened PCM device default
Recording on device default is set to:
1 channels at 22050Hz
Capturing!

When you want to stop recording, simply hit <CTRL>+C in your command line window to exit the process. You will then see output similar to the following as RecordMyDesktop encodes the capture video into the .ogv (Ogg-Vorbis) format:

*********************************************

Cached 99 MB, from 21 MB that were received.
Average cache compression ratio: -360.7 %

*********************************************
Saved 2501 frames in a total of 2495 requests
Shutting down.....
STATE:ENCODING
Encoding started!
This may take several minutes.
Pressing Ctrl-C will cancel the procedure (resuming will not be possible, but
any portion of the video, which is already encoded won't be deleted).
Please wait...
Output file: out.ogv
[100%] 
Encoding finished!
Wait a moment please...

Done.
Written 37337459 bytes
(35610929 of which were video data and 1726530 audio data)

Cleaning up cache...
Done!!!
Goodbye!
$

Note: you can explore the available command line option on the RecordMyDesktop Man Page


Using the gtk-RecordMyDesktop Utility

There is a GUI front-end for RecordMyDesktop, which is a little easier to use. You can invoke it from the command line using the following syntax (-note, like all Linux commands this is case sensitive):

gtk-recordMyDesktop

Alternatively, you can invoke it directly from desktop the same way you would any other application - for example, in Fedora, you can search for it in the Activities area:

gtk-RecordMyDesktop Icon

Whichever method you choose, a dialogue box should open up, allowing you to configure exactly what you want to be captured, where the output will be written, the quality settings and more:

gtk-RecordMyDesktop Window

Once you have made any adjustments, click on the "Record" button to begin recording: the dialogue box will then close. Alternatively, you can click on the "Record" button that will appear in your "System Tray" (-for example, this appears when you hover the mouse over the bottom right corner of the screen in Fedora):

gtk-RecordMyDesktop Record Button

During recording, this icon will change to a square "Stop" icon, which can be clicked to end the recording:

gtk-RecordMyDesktop Stop Button

When you click the "Stop" icon, the video encoding will begin and the following dialogue will display showing the progress (note that this will take some considerable time - depending on the length of the recorded session):

gtk-RecordMyDesktop Encoding Window

The resulting video can then be opened and edited in a video editor such as KDEnlive or uploaded directly to the web!


Further Reading:


HomeSite IndexDesktop GuideServer GuideHints and TipsHardware CornerVideo SectionContact Us

 sitelock verified Firefox Download Button