Application Topic
   >  Installing Linux Software
   >  Using the Ubuntu Software Centre
   >  Using the Fedora Software Centre
   >  Installing from the Software Centre
   >  Remove Software Centre Apps
   >  Checking Software Centre Apps
   >  Installing Apps in Puppy QuickPet
   >  Installing Apps in Puppy Package Manager
   >  Installing Software from the Web
   >  Installing Apps in TinyCore
   >  Installing Apps in Mint
   >  Common Linux Applications
   >  Linux Software Repositories

 

Finding and Installing Linux Software

The Linux Software Repository

The main Linux distributions (-known as “distros” for short) all ship with commands to search, download and install new applications, fixes and packages from one (-or more) central repository. The software in these repositories contains all the popular applications that have been tested and verified to run correctly under that distro. As a result, it should be your first point of call when looking for new applications or utilities.

[your Distro's Software Center] should be your first point of call when looking for new applications


The Linux Software Repository

Most distros, such as Ubuntu, Fedora - and even the lightweight Puppy and TinyCore - ship with a GUI application that allows you to browse the catalogue of available software packages and install or remove them. You can liken this to the Appstore on Android or iPad tablets, only the software is all free!

Each distro refers to this by a different name, but their operation is pretty similar. In Ubuntu, it's known as the Software Centre; Fedora calls it simply Software and in Puppy, it's called Quickpet. For the remainder of this chapter, we'll be mainly focusing on the Ubuntu Software Centre (-which is very similar in use to the Fedora equivalent), although we will take a quick look at Quickpet and Adding/Removing Software directly firm the web as well.

Note: to standardize things a little, the Linuceum articles tend to refer to this GUI installer as the Software Centre irrespective of the distro we are refering to

If you install an application using the Software Centre GUI, you can also remove it from the Software Centre (-much like the InstallShield on Windows, only will no discs required). This means that it functions as a single source for all application installation / removal.

.. if your PC starts to misbehave after a certain date, you can use the Software Centre to look back at the applications and updates installed around that time ..

Another advantage of using most Software Centre GUIs is that they normally keep a list of what was installed and when. For example, if your PC starts to misbehave after a certain date, you can use the Software Centre to look back at the applications and updates installed around that time – helping you to narrow down the possible culprits.


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