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   >  Mounting Logical Volumes
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   >  Testing a RAID1 Array
   >  Troubleshooting RAID1 Problems

 

Introduction to RAID

What is RAID?

With discs so cheap these days, it's definitely worth thinking about safeguarding your data using disc mirroring; this is where two (-or more) discs are set up with one (-or more) disc containing an exact copy of the first set. In this way, if one disc fails, a copy can be used instead. Disc drive failures are still common (-perhaps as a consequence of squeezing more data into cheaper units) so anything you can't afford to lose needs protection!

There are several different types of RAID configuration but in this section we will concentrate on RAID 1, where one set of discs exactly mirrors another

A common - and relatively simple - way of providing this protection is RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive Discs). There are several different types of RAID configuration but in this section we'll be concentrating on RAID 1, where one set of discs exactly mirrors another. One advantage of RAID 1 is that Linux will automatically detect where a drive has failed and will mount the copy in place of it, seamlessly!


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